Death is not the Enemy

I propose that death, and for that matter birth, old age and disease as well (sometimes dubbed the fourfold miseries of material existence) are there to serve us. They are there in support of our purpose. Indeed they are necessary to our purpose.

But how? And do they really need to be so extreme and harsh? I propose they are actually no more or less graphic than necessary, in fact just dramatic enough to make entirely believable the notion that we are mortal/temporary, limited … and so on. We need to believe this in order to enjoy the material world. In much the same way that one cannot enjoy a movie properly if awareness that it is make-believe remains at the forefront of one’s consciousness, properly tasting the range of material enjoyments requires ignorance of our eternal spiritual nature in order to fully enter the experience.

Just as forgetting the movie is not real serves our enjoyment of the movie, likewise believing we are temporary facilitates experience of a whole range of tastes/emotions specifically available in the material world only.

So for those who wish to exercise their divinity by making choices in terms of material world enjoyments, for them death is not the enemy. Graphic and horrific it may be, but it is no more so than to facilitate our believing it to be real. After all, if it were a woolly experience it might not convince us, and then where would we be?

And if you decide you no longer aspire for material life … if the illusion of death has ceased to serve you, of course it is your right to express your divinity in that way*. That being the case, you could say that your death is more for those who are left behind than for yourself. A final gesture, if you like, to help keep the myth alive for those who want it!

* with more self-knowledge yes, but not necessarily a greater or more perfect expression … see my Always Perfect essay for more on this